Figurative Language In Hiroshima By John Hersey

The use of figurative language is crucial for the success of Hiroshima, as it showcases the devastation and ruins of the city. Hersey’s descriptions are compelling, evoking sympathy and reminding the audience of the victims’ losses. This novel is one of Hersey’s best, and it’s important to note the ways in which he uses figurative language to support his story.

The use of figurative language is necessary for conveying the horror and devastation of Hiroshima to the reader. In fact, Hersey describes everything in the novel, from the sound to the smells. In each of the six accounts of the events in the city, Hersey utilizes descriptive language to let the reader get a sense of what’s happening.

Another example of Hersey’s use of figurative language is his inclusion of an epigraph in which Brother Juniper wonders about the events that have taken place. The author focuses on the aftermath of the bombing, and his use of figurative language makes it more accessible to the reader. In Hiroshima, Hersey becomes the writer behind the work, encouraging readers to believe that the survivors met by chance.

The use of figurative language in Hiroshima is crucial for conveying the horror and ruins of the city. Although many of the characters have a negative reaction, Hersey uses figurative language to make these characters appear as pitiful and disgusting as possible. This technique allows the reader to process the horror in a direct manner. It is also an important tool for the author’s purpose in the novel, and it should be used wisely.

Using figurative language in Hiroshima is crucial in conveying the devastation of the city. It is essential to describe the experience in detail. In addition, Hersey uses a variety of literary devices to do this. For example, she describes how the eyes melt, a scene that is similar to an actual experience in Hiroshima, and she writes about how the eyeballs are not in the right position to perceive it.

In Hiroshima, Hersey uses figurative language to build a pathos. He reveals the horror of the survivors by making use of a journalistic tone. Hersey uses a variety of figurative language to create an emotionally powerful narrative. By using such figurative language, the novel leads the reader to question the reality of the Hiroshima city.

The use of figurative language in Hiroshima is an important way to convey meaning. Hersey uses various types of imagery to convey the effects of the devastating atomic bomb. Moreover, he uses a variety of descriptive details to make the readers feel what is happening in the city. Hersey also makes use of a number of idioms in the story.

In Hiroshima, Hersey uses figurative language in order to build a pathos. In addition, his account of the destruction and the suffering of Hiroshima inspires the reader to rethink his own perceptions of the city. The author is very careful to evoke the emotions of the victims, so he can use figurative language to convey them more effectively.

Hersey’s use of figurative language is crucial in the book. The use of a series of coincidences in Hiroshima predisposes the reader to assume that the events are supernatural in nature. This is a powerful technique that Hersey employs throughout the novel. It is the same in the book. Its figurative language is a key tool for the author.

In addition to using figurative language to convey the characters’ emotions, Hersey also uses coincidences in the book. For instance, in the opening sentence, Mrs. Nakamura passes a Jesuit mission shortly after the bomb explodes. Immediately after, she notices a man with a suitcase. Later, she attributes the suitcase a symbolic value.

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